Power over Ethernet or PoE, allows a single cable to provide both data connection and electrical power to networked pieces of equipment such as sensors, IP video cameras and even wireless mesh nodes. PoE works across standard network cabling (i.e. CAT5) to supply power directly from the data ports to which networked devices are connected.

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A couple of months ago, we wrote about naval experiments with “sense and avoid” technology . The point behind the article was that “sense and avoid” technology is one of the gaiting factors behind the FAA approving widespread use and application of unmanned aircraft. The FAA regulations clearly state that sense and avoidance would be the sole responsibility of the unmanned aircraft when sharing airspace with manned aircraft.

Here’s some promising news on that front. General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. (GA ASI), recently announced two key technological advances related to its ongoing Sense and Avoid (SAA) system development efforts.

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As the leading provider of ultra-compact Ethernet switches, we are often specified in to environments that are often labeled as “sensor pods”. Since the term “sensor” seems so generic, I thought I’d do a little research on what some these sensor technologies are and what were some of their applications . As I was investigating their applications, I found that several of the military uses are quickly making it to commercial applications.

1) Hyperspacial Sensors. These sensors use reflections from hundreds of bands in the infrared range of the electromagnetic spectrum. We all understand that cameras and eyeballs use UV to identify targets by their shape or by contrasts of light and dark. Well, hyperspectral scanners use reflections of various IR wavelengths to determine the material that a target is made of. Every object has its own unique “fingerprint” and hyperspacial sensors collect the data and help match it up to those “fingerprints”. Today, military applications of hyperspacial sensors include detecting roadside bombs and fields of illegal drugs such poppies for opium.

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It seems to me that “sense and avoid” technology is the gaiting factor for wide-spread adoption and deployment of unmanned vehicles. What caught my eye when reading the FAA’s future requirements to allow unmanned aircraft in to the field was that the responsibility of “sense and avoid” technology was going to solely lie at the feet of those developing unmanned aircraft.

Manned aircraft being developed for future generations would not have this responsibility, which seems a bit one-sided. I mean, if they are all going to be up in the air together, shouldn’t they all be required to have the same capabilities to avoid collision?

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MILTECH 912 Rugged Military Ethernet Switch

Here at MilSource, we’re happy to announce that Techaya has expanded upon it MILTECH 908MP compact Ethernet switching platform.  The new MILTECH 912 is a managed Ethernet switch that offers the same advanced network features including VLANs, traffic prioritization (QoS) and bandwidth aggregation, but has expanded its port density to 12 triple-speed (10/100/1000 Mbps) Ethernet ports using 2 D-38999 connectors.

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Since Techaya’s line of military-grade Ethernet switches are built from the ground up to meet the major military requirements, we are often asked to define what some of the particular specifications are that our Ethernet switches comply to. We recently discussed MIL-STD 1275 which defines the characteristics of a 28 VDC power system. Today we’re going to discuss MIL-STD-461 which is a US military standard that describes how to test equipment for electromagnetic compatibility.

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Techaya’s complete line for military-grade Ethernet switches, routers and hubs are developed from the ground up to meet rigorous military standards for shock, vibration, temperature rating power requirements and other rigorous standards to ensure that a piece of equipment will hold up under the most toughest of mission, terrains and volatile situations. We often get questions as to what MIL-STD 1275 is when it comes to meeting power requirement.

MIL-STD-1275 covers the characteristics of 28-VDC (as opposed to 12 VDC) electrical systems in military vehicles and provides detailed requirements for military ground platform electrical systems, including electromagnetic compatibility (EMC), starting mode, normal operating mode, generator-only mode operation, and their associated spikes, surges and operating limits.

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Image of AEODRS UGV

The Advanced Explosive Ordnance Disposal Robotic System (AEODRS) is a Navy-sponsored program for developing a new generation of open, modular robotic systems. The military services have successfully used ground robots in the fight against terror over the past decade. In addition, U.S. and international law enforcement agencies have experienced the benefit of these systems in conducting dangerous and life-threatening tasks that have saved lives throughout the world.

However, there has been a deepening of concern that the lack of interoperability between unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) systems imposes limitations on development and deployment, complicating the integration of advanced technologies and control schemes. The Advanced Explosive Ordnance Disposal Robotic System (AEODRS) is a new program sponsored by the Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technology Division (NAVEODTECHDIV) and currently under test and development at John Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (JHUAPL).

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When we think of drones, or UAS, we usually think of small unmanned aircraft used by the military for remote missions, or commercial deployments that are being developed for a myriad of useful applications. But this is a really interesting application of an “unmanned aircraft”. Taking an F-16 and retrofitting it to fly unmanned allows the for some interested testing of air-.  to-missile and sensor technology testing and development.

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In today’s modern warfare where survivability and mission success is dependent on data acquisition, analysis and instruction, a growing number of Ethernet-based devices supporting these missions must be connected to the central mission computer, and often to each other. Ethernet switches are needed throughout the military infrastructure as a common means of making such connections. We often get the question from customers on whether they need a managed switch or an unmanaged switch. So, today, we’re going to talk about the basic capabilities of each.

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